Marquette University Campus Ministry
Pope Francis says, return to Galilee!

During his Easter Vigil homily, Pope Francis encouraged the faithful to return to Galilee, to the place where their faith lives began. His words stirred the hearts of many, including our Salt & Light retreatants who gathered this week to celebrate Easter and discuss the pope’s most recent message.

Want to join in on the conversation?

Below is the Easter Vigil homily text, followed by questions for reflection.

The Gospel of the resurrection of Jesus Christ begins with the journey of the women to the tomb at dawn on the day after the Sabbath.  They go to the tomb to honour the body of the Lord, but they find it open and empty.  A mighty angel says to them: “Do not be afraid!” (Mt 28:5) and orders them to go and tell the disciples: “He has been raised from the dead, and indeed he is going ahead of you to Galilee” (v. 7).  The women quickly depart and on the way Jesus himself meets them and says: “Do not fear; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me” (v. 10).

After the death of the Master, the disciples had scattered; their faith had been utterly shaken, everything seemed over, all their certainties had crumbled and their hopes had died.  But now that message of the women, incredible as it was, came to them like a ray of light in the darkness.  The news spread: Jesus is risen as he said.  And then there was his command to go to Galilee; the women had heard it twice, first from the angel and then from Jesus himself: “Let them go to Galilee; there they will see me”.

 Galilee is the place where they were first called, where everything began!  To return there, to return to the place where they were originally called.  Jesus had walked along the shores of the lake as the fishermen were casting their nets.  He had called them, and they left everything and followed him (cf. Mt4:18-22).

To return to Galilee means to re-read everything on the basis of the cross and its victory.  To re-read everything – Jesus’ preaching, his miracles, the new community, the excitement and the defections, even the betrayal – to re-read everything starting from the end, which is a new beginning, from this supreme act of love.

For each of us, too, there is a “Galilee” at the origin of our journey with Jesus.  “To go to Galilee” means something beautiful, it means rediscovering our baptism as a living fountainhead, drawing new energy from the sources of our faith and our Christian experience.  To return to Galilee means above all to return to that blazing light with which God’s grace touched me at the start of the journey.  From that flame I can light a fire for today and every day, and bring heat and light to my brothers and sisters.  That flame ignites a humble joy, a joy which sorrow and distress cannot dismay, a good, gentle joy.

In the life of every Christian, after baptism there is also a more existential “Galilee”: the experience of a personal encounter with Jesus Christ who called me to follow him and to share in his mission.  In this sense, returning to Galilee means treasuring in my heart the living memory of that call, when Jesus passed my way, gazed at me with mercy and asked me to follow him.  It means reviving the memory of that moment when his eyes met mine, the moment when he made me realize that he loved me.

Today, tonight, each of us can ask: What is my Galilee?  Where is my Galilee?  Do I remember it?  Have I forgotten it?  Have I gone off on roads and paths which made me forget it?  Lord, help me: tell me what my Galilee is; for you know that I want to return there to encounter you and to let myself be embraced by your mercy.

The Gospel of Easter is very clear: we need to go back there, to see Jesus risen, and to become witnesses of his resurrection.  This is not to go back in time; it is not a kind of nostalgia.  It is returning to our first love, in order to receive the fire which Jesus has kindled in the world and to bring that fire to all people, to the very ends of the earth. “Galilee of the Gentiles” (Mt 4:15; Is 8:23)!  Horizon of the Risen Lord, horizon of the Church; intense desire of encounter…  Let us be on our way!

Questions for reflection …

  • What is my Galilee? Where is my Galilee?
  • How am I being salt for the earth & light for the world today?
  • Where is that Easter joy present in my life?
  • In what ways can I shine this Easter season?

marquetteactionprogram:

Kicking off our campaign’s Tumblr is a feature about the Working Boys Center. We will be posting every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. So stay tuned with updates about our campaign and our goal of raising $2,000.

The students of IMAP travel to Quito, Ecuador to spend time at the Working Boys…

Learn more about our IMAP program … and please consider donating to our campaign!

Feeling the RCIA love

image

Joey Flores is feeling the RCIA love.

As April 27th draws near, members of the campus community — and beyond — have been bombarding the junior biomedical sciences major with congratulatory emails, texts, and high-fives. That is the day Flores and fellow student Sarah Cleland will be initiated into the Catholic Church.

Flores says having the support of his family, friends, Kappa Sigma fraternity brothers, and greater Marquette liturgical community has been great.

“I’ve had a lot of people reach out to congratulate me. One of the fraternity guys who graduated in 1999 who I don’t even know emailed me,” Flores says. “I know almost everyone at (8:00 p.m.) Mass anyway, but I’ll see people from that Mass on the street and they’ll stop and say congratulations and ask how it’s going. It’s really cool”

For Flores, the decision to become Catholic was a long time coming. He’s been going to church for years and says a desire to understand the faith more deeply led him to reach out to the RCIA.  

“I really wanted to learn why we do things,” he explains. “I don’t like going through the motions. I want to know how we can be evangelists to other people and how we can take what we learn from the Gospel and apply that to our lives.”

Flores says the RCIA experience has helped him work on his internal relationship with Christ.

“I’ve become a lot more mindful in my prayers,” he says. “I see now that it’s okay to reach out to Christ for help. It’s okay to pray for others. It’s okay to pray with others for things you may be going through.”

Prayers will certainly be flowing for Flores and Cleland on April 27th. The celebration can’t come soon enough, Flores says.

“I’ve been waiting for this day for so long. I’m ready. I have no reservations. I’m raring to go!” he exclaims.

Please join the campus community on Sunday, April 27that 4:00 p.m. at the Church of the Gesu to celebrate the Sacraments of Initiation!  

Initiation excitement

image

Sarah (center) with her sponsor, Abbey, and Most Rev. Jerome E. Listecki, Archbishop of MIlwaukee, at the Rite of Election.

Sarah Cleland has had April 27th circled on her calendar for a while.

Cleland is one of the two Marquette students preparing for initiation into the Catholic Church, a sacramental celebration set to take place on Sunday, April 27th at 4:00 p.m. at the Church of the Gesu. Cleland says she began thinking about becoming Catholic a while ago after attending Mass with her fiancée’s family.

“I think witnessing the power of the community was important and seeing how easy it is to develop your faith when you’re in a room full of people who believe the same thing and are here to support you,” she says.

Cleland and other Marquette students entering the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) process began meeting with Campus Ministry assistant director Steve Blaha and the RCIA team on Thursday nights for prayer, conversation and formation last September. She finds the weekly gathering fruitful.

“I came into RCIA thinking it would be a lot of analyzing the Scripture like a class and trying to figure out what Jesus wanted us to do,” she recalls. “But every week, it surprises me in the best way possible because we end up talking about things that still are very important to Catholicism, but are also very applicable to life.”

The community support, Cleland says, has been critical.

“It can be overwhelming getting into a new faith and you don’t know where to start. That’s why I’ve especially liked our spiritual leaders — everyone from my sponsor to my fiancée to everyone here at RCIA — who know how to guide people and analyze yourself so you can grow even more,” she explains.

Technology also played a huge supporting role for Cleland. Her physical therapy clinical rotations put Cleland in Green Bay for the first few weeks of the second semester. While physically away, she skyped in to the weekly formation sessions and didn’t miss a beat.

“One of my favorite parts was when Fr. Anderson anointed me on camera!” she exclaims.

Cleland is now back on campus and getting excited for Initiation.  

“It’s the acme of everything, the most important part where you’re actually being accepted fully by the community. It’s the culmination of this whole journey,” she says.

Please join the campus community on Sunday, April 27th at 4:00 p.m. at the Church of the Gesu to celebrate the Sacraments of Initiation!  

marquetteactionprogram:

Benefits of College Mission Trips Abroad:
1. Take students out of their “comfort zones” and place them into an environment that encourages physical, mental and spiritual adjustments. 2. Spiritual growth 3. Reflection on life purpose  4. Allow students to immerse themselves into a new culture 5. Engagement with populations that are often unheard  6. Bring students to see the gritty realities of the world 7. Teach students about social justice issues in different regions 8. Students get a better understanding of human dignity and people’s universal needs 9. Ignition of passion 10. Students become global citizens aware of social issues in other countries with voices to bring change
In light of the Lenten season, please consider giving to our Indiegogo campaign to help give a Marquette student an IMAP experience. Thanks you and God Bless!
http://igg.me/at/MarquetteIMAP

Please support our campaign!

marquetteactionprogram:

Benefits of College Mission Trips Abroad:

1. Take students out of their “comfort zones” and place them into an environment that encourages physical, mental and spiritual adjustments.
2. Spiritual growth
3. Reflection on life purpose
4. Allow students to immerse themselves into a new culture
5. Engagement with populations that are often unheard
6. Bring students to see the gritty realities of the world
7. Teach students about social justice issues in different regions
8. Students get a better understanding of human dignity and people’s universal needs
9. Ignition of passion
10. Students become global citizens aware of social issues in other countries with voices to bring change

In light of the Lenten season, please consider giving to our Indiegogo campaign to help give a Marquette student an IMAP experience. Thanks you and God Bless!

http://igg.me/at/MarquetteIMAP

Please support our campaign!

GRUMPY CAT ON THE LITURGICAL YEAR

maryhomegirl:

From Ash Wednesday 2013:

Grumpy Cat 1 - it's the most wonderful time of the year lent

We love Lent!

Faces of CM: Adam Hurrle

image

Name: Adam Hurrle
Hometown: Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin
Year in School: Junior
Major: Biomedical Engineering
Fun fact: I have two dogs and I spoil them endlessly. 
Campus Ministry involvement: Liturgical Choir president, Knights of Columbus grand knight

What does the Lit Choir offer the Marquette liturgical community?
We offer high quality choral music to accompany the 4 pm Sunday Mass on campus. We are a tight community that encourages communal religious expression through music. 

What motivates you to be involved with Campus Ministry?
I am motivated by my desire to serve God. Campus Ministry is itself a great forum to express love for God and it enables others to do the same.

What is your favorite Campus Ministry memory?
Singing for Mass — whether it be cantoring or the choir, weekday or weekend Mass — has always provided wonderful memories. Being able to contribute to the liturgy along with my friends in choir is a blessing. 

From today’s second reading … 

From today’s second reading … 

On Thursday, March 20, the Most Rev. Jerome E. Listecki, archbishop of Milwaukee, presided at the Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion in the Chapel of the Holy Family. These rituals are part of the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults process. 

During the liturgy, the archbishop named students Joey Flores and Sarah Cleland as members of the elect and invited them to receive the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, and First Eucharist on Sunday, April 27. The archbishop also encouraged students completing their Christian initiation and those seeking full communion with the Catholic Church to use the Lenten season to strengthen their faithfulness to Christ and their baptismal calling. 

Photos by Tom Tulp, Arts ‘14

Faces of CM: Alex Whalen

Name: Alex Whalen
Hometown: St. Charles, Missouri 
Year in School: Senior
Major: Communication Studies with a Theology minor
Fun fact: I can walk on my toes like a monkey.
Campus Ministry involvement: MUEX student director, M.A.P. facilitator

What is the Marquette Experience Retreat (MUEX)?
MUEX is a time to learn about what Marquette has meant to you. The retreat is where we take the Ignatian buzzwords and apply them to life and the Marquette experience as a whole. This retreat is based in love and understanding of one’s self and one’s experience.  

What motivates you to be involved with Campus Ministry?
Truthfully, this kind of work is what I want to do with my life. The community and family involved in this helped me find my passion and friends that make Marquette feel like home.

What is your favorite Campus Ministry memory?
Definitely, it is when the retreat leaders all joined in singing “Bohemian Rhapsody” on the way back from the Campus Ministry leader’s retreat.